Facebook is the Mafia

Facebook Mafia

When Facebook began changing their algorithms over the last few years, companies and brands saw a massive decrease in organic reach. Essentially, it appeared that Facebook was intentionally removing content from the newsfeeds of people who liked their pages. It seemed like overnight companies who had spent years building a fanbase were suddenly set back to square one, and it felt like the mafia was extorting brands just to keep business as usual. Recently, some analysts discovered the degree to which this is true, and while they are attempting to put a positive spin on the idea, it seems pretty clear that Facebook’s main message is: “pay up or else.” What analysts have discovered is if you pay for “sponsored” content there is a lift in your organic reach. It appears that whatever algorithm is in place to leash your content is completely let loose so that it will interact normally within the Facebook microcosm.

Yesterday we had another article that discussed why advertising sucks. Basically, misusing information gained without consent results in irrelevant, repetitive, obnoxious ads, that are based on rare one-time purchases (and sometimes not even that). It’s almost like Facebook is doing the opposite by not serving content from brands that consumers actually want to see. At least not without first putting a knife to the backs of those brands and asking for money. Nobody wins in this scenario – except Facebook. The book of faces is also attempting to get into the content distribution side with “instant articles.” Recognizing to incontestable facts: 1) most people get their content from Facebook, and 2) most content is and will be consumed on mobile, they are positioning themselves to corner that market. Facebook-mafia goes to the bakery and demands payment unless something “unfortunate” should happen to the bread on the way to the deli. Then they go to the deli saying that they can guarantee customers if they swear loyalty. At what point will they start demanding payment?